What I’ll Miss About Rome: Part II

Have you ever taken a bite out of a meal, whether it be your mom’s home cooking or the fanciest restaurant you’ve ever been to, and thought, “This is the best thing I have ever eaten. I could die, and be content, because this will have been the last thing I have eaten.”

Try to go through that emotional reaction every meal, every day, for four months.

As a lover of food of all kinds, I was most excited for the food and the wine in Italy: every type of pasta, pizza, cheese would be at arm’s reach, ready to be savored, worshipped. I had no clue that there would be foods I never even thought of tasting would be tried, and loved.

My first meal in Rome, I had Carbonara, a signature Italian dish. It is spaghetti, cooked with eggs, and either complemented with jowl or pancetta (bacon). Jowl is the traditional meat. It’s an incredibly delicious meal, and seems strange to foreigners: it’s like a breakfast pasta, but tastes nothing of the sort.

Photo by Hannah Goheen
Photo by Hannah Goheen

We also had bruschette (made with the -ca sound, which is contrary to popular belief) with bacon fat on the top. How delicious?! Bacon fat? I knew from that moment on I would come back to Rome at least 10 pounds heavier. Afterwards, a delcious homemade tiramisu was served, which is automatically delicious.

Photo by Hannah Goheen
Photo by Hannah Goheen

Needless to say, my love for la cittá eterna would not be as vast without its delicious food. What made the food even better was the company that came with it: the three hour dinners, bottles upon bottles of wine…a connection is made with food, and people often take the beauty of it for granted.

Ci vediamo,

Hannah

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Things I’ll Miss About Rome: Part 1

So, because I have insane jetlag and intense Rome-sickness, I felt the need to share the things I miss the most about la cittá eterna. I was definitely not expecting to miss it, considering I was so excited to be home! SO, for the next few posts, expect a lot of Rome.

One of the biggest things I will miss about Rome is the history of this city, so well blended with its modern touches.

Photo by Hannah Goheen
Monti Neighborhood Photo by Hannah Goheen

Though often times it seemed touristy, there is so much history EVERYWHERE. Art, architecture, people…even food has a bit of history thrown in there. Four months is not enough; I only made it through a layer. There is a saying in Italian about discovering Rome: “Una vita non basta Roma”, which means, A lifetime is not enough for Rome. It’s one of the most truthful things I’ve ever heard. Even leaving, I never got the chance to go inside St. Peter’s Basilica. There is so much of Rome left to see, and I can’t wait to go back and experience it.

One of my favorite pieces of history in Rome was (obviously) the Colosseum. It was built in 70-80 AD, and is still the largest amphitheatre in the entire world. It is partially ruined due to earthquakes and people not caring that it is an incredible slice of history, but it is the iconic image of Roma. When you think of the city, you think Il Colosseo.

Picture by Hannah Goheen
Picture by Hannah Goheen

People used to watch games and performances there. People just like us, engaging in community and social events, in such a vast, spacious arena.

The history is also vastly extensive, compared to America’s. In Italian times, America is a little baby. Though they have not been unified for long, Roman history has lasted since the beginning of civilization — Roman times even correspond to the birth and death of Jesus Christ.

How grateful am I to have seen one of the most influential dynasties and its work before my very eyes.

Ci vediamo,

Hannah